OUTBREAK OF BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA INFECTION: A SYSTEMATIC STUDY IN A HEMATOLOGY-ONCOLOGY UNIT OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL FROM EASTERN INDIA.

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Shuvra Neel Baul
Rajib De
PRAKAS KUMAR MANDAL *
Swagnik Roy
Tuphan Kanti Dolai
Prantar Chakrabarti
(*) Corresponding Author:
PRAKAS KUMAR MANDAL | prakas70@gmail.com

Abstract

Background: Burkholderia cepacia, an aerobic gram-negative bacillus, is a frequent colonizer of fluids used in the hospital ward. It poses little risk of infection to healthy people; however it is a known important opportunistic pathogen causing morbidity and mortality due to its intrinsic resistance to most of the antibiotics in hospitalized patients. Small hospital outbreaks are frequent. B. cepacia may occur as an opportunistic infection in hemato-oncology patients.  Here we present an outbreak of  Burkholderia cepacia infection in hematology ward of our institute.

Methods: Febrile episodes as defined by IDSA guideline, 2010 were followed, and blood for culture and sensitivity was sent in all the events. The culture was done by an automated method using Bactalert 3d  Biomeriux  & sensitivity pattern by Microscan Siemens method and subsequently detected by  PCR based method.

Results: During   September 2016 to February 2017 (six months), a total of 498 blood cultures were sent during febrile episodes. Out of which 60 (12%) came out to be positive for different microorganisms. Out of all positive cultures, Burkholderia cepacia was detected in 29 (48%)  patients, which reduced drastically following the change in antibiotic administration practice.  All isolates showed sensitivity to pipercillin+tazobactum, cefoperazone+sulbactum, fluoroquinolones, cotrimoxazole and carbapenems and resistance to polymyxin B and colistin. With timely intervention by appropriate intravenous antibiotics as per culture sensitivity result and change in antibiotic preparation practice, overall mortality was low 1 (4%) out of 29 culture positive episodes.  


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Author Biographies

Shuvra Neel Baul, Department of Haematology, NRS Medical College, Kolkata

Department of Haematology, NRS Medical College, Kolkata

PRAKAS KUMAR MANDAL, DEPARTMENT OF HEMATOLOGY, N.R.S. MEDICAL COLLEGE, 138, A.J.C. BOSE ROAD; KOLKATA-700014.

MD (PATHOLOGY), DM (CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY),

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR,

DEPARTMENT OF HEMATOLOGY,

N.R.S. MEDICAL COLLEGE,

138, A.J.C. BOSE ROAD;

KOLKATA-700014.

Prantar Chakrabarti, Department of Haematology, NRS Medical College, Kolkata

Department of Haematology, NRS Medical College, Kolkata

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